Friday, 30 October 2009

De Batavier



Facade design in Lootstraat, Amsterdam, a 'library' of 250 ceramic books with spines featuring the works of 18th and 19th century Dutch writers and poets who lived in the street.
Sanja Medic

Wednesday, 28 October 2009

Letters

Door verschillende letters en kleuren te kiezen kan een mooi en spannend beeld worden gecreëerd. De letters zijn gemaakt van EPS met een slijtvaste coating. De twee houten letters bieden de mogelijk om als zit meubel gebruikt te worden.
Pieter de Leeuw

Tuesday, 27 October 2009

Friday, 23 October 2009

Salvadrawer

This piece offers a combination of functional and esthetic quality aiming to prick up the mundane book shelves. The 39*42 cm mirror and the terracotta pot plant as well as the decorative back offer a different approach to books and artifact showcasing in the living space. Materials: reclaimed oak, Douglass fir, plywood, brass.
Ubico Studio

Tuesday, 20 October 2009

YPS (Your Private Shelving)

This modular storage system is based on construction elements of bridges, and old steel buildings. Chains of diagonal supporting beams, creating strong construction triangles, are fixed on the shelves. The repetition, and flow of the diagonal lines give the system an exciting, and characteristic appearance. The system is expandable with walls, and doors giving the opportunity to create closed compartments customisable to ones wishes.
Jochem Faudet

Monday, 19 October 2009

Saturday, 17 October 2009

Pair of George III Mahogany Library Bookcase Cabinets

Featuring glazed doors with astragal molding over cabinet doors. Refurbished hardware and interiors. Provenance: Vanderpoel Group, New York, NY. Part of the Barbra Streisand auction.

Friday, 9 October 2009

Tree

Often the books about design, art and architecture don’t fit on ordinary book-shelves. The Tree shelf-stand allows keeping and using albums of any format.
Kibardin Design

Wednesday, 7 October 2009

MoMA Book/Shelf

Featuring works that transform books through a variety of mediums, Book/Shelf stresses an expanded notion of the illustrated book. The exhibition begins with a documentation of Marcel Duchamp's Unhappy Readymade (1919)—a work created when the artist, while traveling, asked his sister back home to hang a geometry book on his balcony in order to let the wind flip and tear the pages. It continues with works in which artists appropriate books by others, such as a sculpture by Martin Kippenberger made partly of books, and a copy of Duchamp's catalogue raisonné rebound by David Hammons under the title Holy Bible. Artists who tackle the idea of books in film (William Wegman), sound works (On Kawara), prints (Edward Ruscha), and drawings (Steve Wolfe) are represented as well. Finally, the exhibition surveys a number of artists who have created installations that display books in public contexts, including Brian Belott, Allen Ruppersberg, Josh Smith (pictured above), and Lawrence Weiner.
MoMA

Tuesday, 6 October 2009

book shelf

These shelves use the wall to redistribute weight, allowing a wide span with minimal hardware. Segmented compartments accommodated oversized art books and the frame functions as bookends. Like a built-in, that you can take with you.
Jason Neufeld

Monday, 5 October 2009

Embrace

The original brief was set to design a modern take on the Isokon Penguin Donkey, that was within 10% of the originals dimensions. The outcome was “embrace” an award winning piece of furniture, designed to store modern media such as DVD's, CD’s and Magazines. This smart piece of furniture naturally forms two low modern tables that are then 'embraced' together in order to form a storage unit / magazine rack / occasional table. The flowing curves are produced by laminating plywood, which is then skillfully veneered. Laminating consists of bonding together many layers in order to produce one solid shape. Embrace is available in a variety of materials and finishes. Modeled below in cherry veneered plywood and glacier white corian.
John Green Designs

Friday, 2 October 2009

Bookshelves by Hans-Peter Feldmann

"Bookshelves" is a 5-panel, life-size photograph of Feldmann's own bookshelves at his home in Düsseldorf. As an artist renowned for using found and discarded objects of others, "Bookshelves" is a rare look at the personal world of a voyeur through the looking glass. The dialectical tension between the banality of the shelf itself and its physical size becomes paramount, as there is a counterintuitive ruse in showing an everyday object shown at a grandiose scale. This idea, however, is unexpectedly met with the fact that the everyday object exists in actuality at the same size. Feldmann mocks photography's promise of a replica of reality, as the obvious impossibility of browsing a fake library (even at life size) becomes an endearingly cruel gag.
303 Gallery